October 26th, 2017

Local London Drugs stores and What’s the Green Deal bring home a Surrey, BC Green City Award.

Store manager Elly Kurucz receives the Surrey Green City Award from Mayor Linda Hepner with (left to right) Lorne Craig, Sue Malloy and Susan Kellock. 
Photo courtesy The City of Surrey – Photographer: Brian Dennehy

Recycling is hard work, so when representatives from our Surrey stores got to step on stage and accept the Green City Award from Surrey Mayor and Council, they were both excited and a bit humbled.

“I have been with London Drugs for 28 years and I’m so proud tonight to be recognized for all we do at our stores and corporately,” said Guildford Town Centre Store Manager Elly Kurucz, “We care deeply for our communities and are wholeheartedly committed to the continued journey toward sustainability, reducing waste and providing greener shopping options.”

Surrey, BC London Drugs stores average a 94.65% diversion rate and in the last two years have diverted over 1.3 MILLION lbs of waste from landfill.

The waste diversion achievements of our 5 Surrey locations – #9 Guildford, #8 London Station, #42 White Rock, #81 Morgan Crossing and #75 Cloverdale, are a testament to the hard work of staff at each location.
The four pillars of London Drugs’ unique What’s the Green Deal program were also recognized, showing just how important corporate sustainability can be at the local level.

It was a gala night, honoring community leaders across the spectrum. Photo: Lorne Craig

“The caliber of award recipients we got to share this stage with was amazing.”

That was the general response among the London Drugs group as we watched other award winners like the New Hope Community Services Society, the Canucks Autism Network, and individuals like Alex Martel and Douglas Nickerson get recognized for helping refugees, supporting aboriginal youth and saving lives.

On behalf of our five Surrey locations, the whole London Drugs team would like to thank the City Of Surrey for this honour, and pledge that we will continue to work to make all of our communities as green as we possibly can.

April 18th, 2016

London Drugs Prince George Cleans Up Again With Spring Recycling Round-Up

Christian Schenk, Store Manager at London Drugs, Prince George Mayor Lyn Hall

Christian Schenk, Store Manager at London Drugs, Prince George Mayor Lyn Hall

It’s springtime, and that means getting rid of clutter. Once again, London Drugs helped citizens of Prince George avoid cluttering landfills at the same time, with a recycling drop-off event featuring some very green partners.

Saturday April 16th, The London Drugs parking lot was host to Tire Stewardship BC, Kidseat Recyclers and the Recycling & Environmental Action Planning Society (REAPS). Polaris Montessori Elementary School students helped customers with free recycling of their tires, while old car seats could be dropped off for a recycling fee of $10.

Prince George Mayor Lyn Hall and Councillor Garth Frizzell also dropped by to lend a hand and add their support. Mayor Hall was quoted in a News 250 article on the event; “We’re striving to become a green community and environmentally this is a huge thing for us to undertake.”

LD-recycling-event1-PG-2016The London Drugs store team was also on hand to remind people of all the recyclables they can bring back to the store ANY day of the year.

“We had an opportunity to tell customers about the various programs we offer; Bring Back The Pack, battery recycling, electronics recycling, etc,” says Christian Schenk, store manager at London Drugs. “I had an opportunity to talk with the mayor and let him know about what we are doing to take care of the “footprint” that we create. He was quite impressed and even commented that he wished other larger businesses would do the same.”

Way to go, P.G. You are the REAL Green Deal!

For a look at last year’s recycling event, and an inspiring clean-up by College Heights Secondary students, check out our Green Heroes of the North video here.

From right, Prince George Mayor Lyn Hall, City Councillor Garth Frizzell, Polaris Montessori Elementary School PAC representative Melanie Noullett and students help recycle tires – photo 250News

From right, Prince George Mayor Lyn Hall, City Councillor Garth Frizzell, Polaris Montessori Elementary School PAC representative Melanie Noullett and students help recycle tires – photo 250News

Melanie Risdon-Betcher, owner, Kidseat recyclers photo 250News

Melanie Risdon-Betcher, owner, Kidseat recyclers photo 250News

February 11th, 2016

Got a Great Green Friend? Send them our Video Valentine.

From the Saskatchewan Mom who brings in all her kids batteries, to the Lower Mainland team that takes care of our electronics recycling, to the kids who clean up the roadside litter in Prince George, it takes a big green village to make a difference. So we wanted to say ‘Thanks’ and show our love with this little Valentine’s Day video. If you have a special green person in your life, feel free to pass it along to them. Because sharing appreciation for everyone’s efforts, is the REAL Green Deal. Happy Valentine’s Day!

October 19th, 2015

How to lose 100lb in a week (From your garbage, that is) 
Canada Waste Reduction Week, Oct 19 – 25, 2015

How to recycle electronics batteries and appliances at London Drugs

Waste is still piling up. It’s time to take action! And this week is a great time to make new commitments and shed those unwanted pounds.

Recycling and Waste Reduction Week started in 2001, when recycling councils and organizations from across Canada came together and expanded their local efforts into a national event.

Divert those food scraps! Use your municipal food scraps collection, if you have one. And compost the peels, rinds and uncooked veggie matter in a backyard composter.
Weight of food scraps an average Western Canadian family produces per week: 3kg / 6.6 lbs *

Recycle an old computer. Who needs a computer that can’t even open a 2015 web page? Bring it to London Drugs. We’ll make sure it’s recycled right, and the data destroyed.
Weight of an average old junky computer: 5Kg – 11 lb Weight of an old CRT style screen: 10Kg – 22 lb

Recycle those old batteries! The average household throws out about 8 batteries per year. That may not sound like a lot, but dry cell batteries contribute about 88 percent of the total mercury and 50 percent of the cadmium in the municipal solid waste stream. (US stat*) So bring those in to us, and shave a few important ounces off your waste.
8 AA batteries approx .2 Kg – .44 lb

Recycle a small appliance According to one estimate, Canadians purchase over 24 million small appliances a year.* So what happens to the old ones? Well if it has a power cord, you can recycle your small appliances right at your local London Drugs.
Average weight of a clothes iron: 1kg – 2.2 lb

Recycle that old FatScreen It’s time to join the 2000’s. Flat screens are bigger, better, lighter and use way less energy. So if you have an old tube style TV lying around, don’t chuck it in the dumpster or leave it in the alley. Just bring it to London Drugs for responsible recycling.
Average weight of a 27” Tube TV: 30kg – 66 lb

Total Weight Lost: 46.2Kg – 101.64 lb

Way to go! You did it!  Now make some all-year long waste reduction resolutions to keep that weight off! Here’s a link to all the things you can recycle at your local London Drugs store, and you can always search online for even more stewardship programs and depots in your area.

Waste Reduction Week Canada

Recycling Council of BC

August 24th, 2015

London Drugs sponsors Stewards of the Future, with the Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia

What happens when you take 150 students away from their phones, pads and screens, to talk about the future? Magic.

This was the vision of The Honourable Judith Guichon, Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia, when she created Stewards of the Future, an innovative conference bringing young people from all over BC together to talk about issues, the environment, the economy and the road ahead. The conference was held at Pearson College, a wooded campus on the idyllic shores of Vancouver Island near Sooke, BC. Participants got a chance to take an eco tour of Race Rocks Marine Park, watch stars from the hilltop observatory and absorb inspiration and information from an amazing group of speakers and mentors.

Green Deal blogger Lorne Craig (yours truly) was on hand to speak on a panel about Corporate Responsibility, and share the London Drugs recycling message.

London Drugs was incredibly proud to sponsor this event, and if this group of students are indicative of who will be stepping into leadership, we are in good hands.

July 30th, 2015

Lethbridge store recycles with the best of them in London Drugs Waste Audit

Every year, we visit every single London Drugs store to dig through their trash. But it goes deeper than that. The Waste Audit is part of a continuous process of improvement that looks at the recycling output of each department in the store, and helps make suggestions on how things can be tweaked to keep every last gram of recycling out of the landfill.

Retail Operations Sustainability Specialist Maury McCausland recently visited our Lethbridge London Drugs store, and found that their waste diversion rate is going strong. We captured the Waste Audit process on video, as Lethbridge store Manager Chris Mabie was on hand to help wrangle the bags and pick up on improvements his team can still make.

Let’s raise a bag of recycling and toast the Lethbridge team – you are the real Green Deal!

May 1st, 2015

Green Heroes of the North – We Salute you!

A lot of ‘green’ talk often focuses on urban lifestyles, but as this video shows, Canadians living in more rural areas can be just as heroic when it comes to recycling and community sustainability spirit. We recently visited Prince George BC, where Green Deal’s Lorne Craig delivered a presentation on sustainability issues at College Heights Secondary. This school hosts the Northern Leadership Conference – a day of learning and inspiration for 200 kids from across BC’s North.

We also documented the 10th anniversary of their annual highway cleanup, celebrating 1000km of roadside trash-busting. College Heights teacher Cindy Smith has been tirelessly organizing the event for the last decade, and her inspiration to the students definitely rubbed off on us!

DSC_1732Next, we visited the Prince George London Drugs’ Recycling Roundup where Manager Christian Schenk lifted TV’s, boxed up batteries and took in tires with Tire Stewardship BC. It’s his personal mission to let everyone know what they can recycle at his store!

On the musical side, we attended the premiere concert of the Up Your Watershed Tour, where kids from Highglen Montessori delivered a powerful set of enviro-themed songs under the expert musical direction of Holly Arntzen and Kevin Wright of the Artist Response Team.

DSC_1751

Also known as ‘The Wilds’, Holly and Kevin are touring the Fraser River watershed, teaching and performing with groups of kids at concert stops along the way. (London Drugs is proud to be a sponsor of this awe-inspiring tour as well)

Thanks to the hundreds of Everyday Green Heroes we met on our first Northern Tour. YOU are the REAL Green Deal!

July 21st, 2014

How BC’s new Multi Material Recycling Program works (and why it matters even if you DON’T live in BC!)

On May 19th, 2014, an ambitious new recycling stewardship program was launched in BC, intended to deal with paper and packaging waste, but incorporating a whole lot more. Traditionally, municipalities were responsible for collecting recycling through taxpayer-funded pickup services, then sold the materials to recover costs.

Now, in participating municipalities province-wide, Multi Material BC will be in charge of collecting, processing and selling materials from Blue Box recycling programs.

So how does the funding work? Who processes the waste and where does the money go? We have designed the info graphic below to help answer some of those questions.

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MMBC is not without its critics. Many maintain that there was not enough consultation with business before implementation, and that it does not reward stewards or manufacturers who go above and beyond in recycling behaviour or recyclable design.

The province of BC has been a leader in implementing such Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) programs, and we now have 18 similar industry-funded solutions for everything from tires to lights, used oil, batteries and smoke alarms. Other provinces are watching, so stay tuned and see how MMBC evolves.

We’ll be watching to help make sure it’s the REAL Green Deal!

In the meantime, for London Drugs customers, in BC and elsewhere, we are continuing our in-store recycling services, including our industry-leading Bring back the Pack Program.

September 24th, 2013

London Drugs wins Canadian Stewardship Award

LondonDrugs-stewardship-award2

At the Conference on Canadian Stewardship, London Dugs took top honours in the ‘Business’ category for our ‘What’s the Green Deal’ program and our stores’ efforts to engage and promote stewardship programs.

The conference was attended by hundreds of delegates representing business, manufacturers, retailers, industry associations, municipalities, provincial and federal and territorial government representatives and stewardship programs from across North America and Europe.
LondonDrugs-stewardship-awardAdministrator of Retail Operations Maury McCausland accepted the award from Mark McKenney, Managing Director of the Conference on Canadian Stewardship, on behalf of the thousands of London Drugs employees and customers that have helped make ‘What’s the Green Deal’ a stewardship success story.

“As a regional retailer, we are proud to be recognized at the national level for our recycling programs,” McCausland said, “But the journey continues. So it’s back to work!”

The next Conference on Canadian Stewardship takes place in 2015. We plan to be there, too.

March 26th, 2013

Where does London Drugs recycling go?

Circuit boards can contain gold and other precious metals – Photo: L. Craig

For most of our customers, once their recycling is dropped off, it’s out of sight, out of mind. But for London Drugs, the recycling bin is just the beginning of the process.
We do our homework, choosing recyclers who know where your materials go and what happens to them. This is especially important when it comes to electronics, which can contain some pretty hazardous materials.
So here are some quick notes on what goes where when you bring it to our big Blue Box.

Electronics – TV’s, computers, VCR’s, printers and other electronics are shipped to either GEEP (Alberta, Sask. & Man.) or E-Cycle  where they are separated into components such as plastic, glass, circuit boards, tubes, and various metals. Non-toxic materials are sorted and bundled for sale as commodities for remanufacture. Both GEEP and E-Cycle are certified through ISO 9001:2008 and ISO 14001:2004.
Circuit boards and TV tubes are sent to smelters where they are safely melted down and their precious metals recovered.
NO London Drugs electronics for recycling are shipped offshore unprocessed.

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An Electronics Disassembly Line  – Photo: L.Craig

Small Appliances – As with electronics, all our small appliances are disassembled in Canada and separated into commodities.

Cell Phones and Batteries – These items are handled through the Call-2-Recycle program, the only free used battery and cellphone collection program in North America. Cellphones are recycled, refurbished and/or resold. When resold, a portion of the proceeds are donated to select charities. None of the broken down material makes its way into landfills. Batteries are processed at North American facilities, in BC, Ontario, Quebec and Pennsylvania, for recovery of cadmium and lithium.

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Recycled Paper returns to London Drugs as products.

Paper and CardboardCascades Recovery is our partner for recycling paper and cardboard. It is sorted and bundled up at their Surrey facility and sent to Canadian mills for remanufacture into paper products. Some of our recycled cardboard even makes its way back on to store shelves as recycled toilet tissue!

Soft Plastics, Bottles and Medication Containers – These are also collected by Cascades Recovery and sent to Orbis or Merlin Plastics in Delta, BC.

Styrofoam™ – All expanded polystyrene from London Drugs packaging that customers return is sent to Foam Only in Coquitlam, BC where it is compressed for remanufacture as polystyrene. This is a process that uses no heat and releases no toxins.

Light Bulbs, CFL Bulbs and Fluorescent Tubes – Compact Fluorescent bulbs contain a small amount of mercury, so they must be handled with care. All of our light products are recycled through the LightRecycle program, managed by ProductCare. Bulbs are crushed in a controlled environment, so all toxins are filtered out and recovered.

As you can see, recycling is a complex science that goes well beyond the Blue Box. By working with top suppliers, we are doing our best to ensure we are part of the solution, not creating new problems down the line. If you want to know more, follow us on Twitter @WTGreenDeal, or comment below. We’re happy to talk more recycling with you.

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